A Practical Guide to the Novel Anticoagulants

This morning, Dr. Craig Malloy, Richard A. Lange, M.D. Chair in Cardiology, gave an amazing update for internists on New Therapies fo Atrial Fibrillation. One of the most important topics covered was the noval anticoagulants, or NOACS. Here is a quick review for use in the clinic or hospital!

Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban are three new drugs that have different mechanisms of action, daily doses, and metabolic and elimination profiles.

Dabigatran (Pradaxa) is a direct thrombin inhibitor (it inhibits factor II) that has a half-life of about 12-14 hours and needs to be administered twice daily. It partially binds plasma proteins and can therefore be partially dialysed. Pradaxa is only eliminated renally: it is therefore contraindicated in patients whose creatinine clearance is

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) is a direct factor X inhibitor with a half-life of 5-13 hours, but completely binds plasma proteins. It is administered once daily with evening meal in NVAF patients, and twice daily in those with DVT or PE. It is eliminated by the kidney and liver, and can be used at a lower dose if creatinine clearance is15 mL/min in NVAF patients; its use should be avoided in DVT/PE patients whose creatinine clearance is

Apixaban (Eliquis) is a direct factor X inhibitor with a half-life of 9-14 hours, but completely binds plasma proteins. It is administered twice daily and eliminated by kidney and liver. It should not be used if creatinine clearance is

NOAC trial comparisons

Turiel M, Galaverna S, Colombo C, Gianturco L, Stella D (2015) Practical Guide to the New Oral Anticoagulants. J Gen Pract 3:194. doi: 10.4172/2329-9126.1000I194